Estate Administration

Estate Administration involves the process of handling the affairs of someone who has passed away and distributing the assets they left behind. The person, people, or sometimes company, appointed to handle that process legally are called trustees, executors or administrators. 

From paying debts, filing tax returns, preserving assets, collecting assets and distribution of the estate to the lawful heirs, the role of the executor is wide ranging. Each circumstance may vary in its complexity, depending on a variety of factors. From circumstances where no Will was made, to complicated family structures and asset holdings, each situation is different and having a lawyer that understands the area is critical. An improperly managed estate can lead to complications and costly outcomes, knowing your rights and obligations as either an executor, a beneficiary, or an interested party is important. 

At Aion Law Partners we offer clear guidance in estate administration and have the experience and knowledge to guide you through the process while ensuring you are legally protected in your actions. 

If you have been named as the Estate Trustee, it is best to meet with a lawyer for a detailed review of what is involved.

Have an Estate Administration question?

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At Aion Law Partners we offer clear guidance in estate administration and have the experience and knowledge to guide you through the process while ensuring you are legally protected in your actions.

What Is An Estate?

The term “Estate” is used to describe the affairs of someone who has passed away. For example, if John Smith passed away, all of John Smith’s affairs left behind would be described as the “Estate of John Smith.” This includes everything from assets, to liabilities, and obligations.

WHAT IS AN EXECUTOR, ESTATE TRUSTEE OR AN ADMINISTRATOR?

The terms Executor, Estate Trustee and Administrator are often used interchangeably to describe the person, people, or party that are responsible for an Estate. The decisions of when or how to sell assets, complete tax and legal requirements and to deal with the rightful distribution of assets to beneficiaries (to name a few) are all part of the Executor, Estate Trustee or Administrator’s role.

This role is appointed in a Will. When there is no Will, a court appoints a party, or parties, to take on the role. This can sometimes be long and costly when there are disagreements or when beneficiaries are hard to find. That’s why naming your choice of Executor in a Will is always the best option.